31 August 2020

Could it be Covid?




Paul was unwell over the weekend with tummy pains and diarrhoea.  More worrying was his very high temperature and slight cough.  I immediately de-camped to the guest bedroom.  On Sunday he still had a fever so we booked a Covid test at the local drive-thru centre.

The test centre was at the Lincoln Showground and was clearly signposted.  There were tents, portacabins and cones spread out over a large area.  At the entrance a man approached with a sign telling us not to get out of the car or open the windows.  We trundled on to the next checkpoint where a young woman indicated we ring the ‘phone number displayed on a large sign.  This was so that we could talk to her on her mobile and listen to instructions.  I suppose if you didn’t have a mobile they would just shout at you.

Paul was asked if he wanted to self-administer the test or have someone else do it.  He opted for the self test.  This may not have been a wise choice.  We trundled on to the self-test station.  Ring the number on the sign again.  Asked if anyone was sitting on the back seat.  What?  (We then realised that our rear seats have tinted windows so people outside can’t see in.)  I had to open the rear window so they could lob the testing kit into the back of the car. It was all starting to feel very surreal.

Trundle forward and guided to a parking bay.  There were stewards and cones everywhere.  We only saw one other car at the centre while we were there.  Paul opened the kit and read the instructions.  He had to swab his tonsils five times.  “Where are my tonsils, is it that dangly thing at the back of my throat?”  I told him to aim for the fleshy bits at the side of his dangly thing.  Of course it made him gag.  Then he had to put the swab up his nose before putting it in the specimen bottle and into a bag.

We then drove on to the next station.  Ring the mobile number again.  They checked the bag and scanned it.  Then we were instructed to open the car window and lob the bag into a bucket held at arm’s length by the centre worker.

We were thanked for visiting and guided out of the centre, cheerfully waving at the stewards. It was like a day out at the zoo.

Paul got a text and an e-mail today, 24 hours later, with the result.  Negative.  At least we know he hasn’t got Covid.  I’m still staying in the guest room.


40 comments:

  1. 98.5% of the world are free of this virus. 1.5% have it. Would you normally have been worried by such figures? You are an example of the brainwashed.

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    1. The Cheat likes this sort of thing Sue.

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    2. One of those blog lurkers who know nobody and are friends with nobody and deleted by many.

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    3. Peace of mind is wonderful, one less thing to worry about.

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    4. I think you've spelt "caring for other people" wrong, when you have someone in your household that has to visit a hospital full of vulnerable people and then go back to work closely with an entire RAF squadron it seems sensible to make absolutely sure. I'm glad they care enough about other people to make the tiny trip up the road.

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    5. Not everyone is like me Kat you will be pleased to know and as I don't listen to the news or read newspapers I am totally on my own.

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  2. I don't know why you bothered, no one ever said Covid came with gut pains & diarrhea!! I had the very same symptoms without the fever at the very same time. Still not 100%. Did we get take-out from the same place??? What a totally bizarre experience . . . .

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    1. Diarrhoea can be a rare symptom but the high fever was a concern. The test centre is only just down the road so it wasn't difficult to access.

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  3. Seems like a sensible thing to do. And the virus symptoms may include nausea and diarrhea. No need to call you brainwashed - seems unkind to say. Knowing someone who died from it, and how very ill his family members were makes me one of those who must be brainwashed. I'm happy for those who haven't experienced it.
    Mary

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  4. Interesting to hear about the practical procedures at one of these test sites. As I don't possess a mobile phone I would be on the receiving end of a lot of shouting about my dangly thing and where to stick the swab if I had possible COVID symptoms.

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    1. It was an impressive set up. I felt sorry for the people having to work on a Sunday with very few 'customers'.

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  5. Getting tested was the right thing to do! Eight THOUSAND dead from Covid in my state. It will not be an easy Fall/Winter; is it a ordinary head cold, influenza, stomach bug or OMG Covid??? Hope you both feel better soon.

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    1. I'm fine and Paul is feeling much better today. Probably just a gastro bug.

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  6. I think you definitely did the right thing. Had not heard of self testing. I had a cousin who died from it in Shropshire which really brings it home.

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    1. I don't take this virus lightly, it is scarily contagious.

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  7. You can rest easy knowing the test result is negative. I take lots of Vitamin C when feeling unwell. Also my favorite home remedy, Epsom salt bath in very hot water. Get well soon, Paul.

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    1. He is feeling better this morning but still has a slight fever. Looks like I shall be doing all the dog walks.

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  8. I had no idea self-testing was a thing! Not here, anyway. Husband had a test (up the nose, all the way to the back of the throat, counting backwards from 20 while the little bristly swab was rotated around) so he could visit with his mother in a nursing home. He was negative and said it was a combination of unpleasant and tickly. I'm glad you now have peace of mind that he is negative. -Jenn

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    1. You can get a home self test here too by post but that's a longer process. I was impressed by the speed of the test we did.

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  9. What a bloody palava. Not owning a mobile phone, I can only imagine the extra problems I would have had. I prescribe lots of roast chicken, and chicken soup; he'll soon be better.

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    1. He had a tiny portion of roast chicken yesterday but had to skip the plum tarte tatin.

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  10. Yes. Give him chicken soup.

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  11. I am suprised that you and Kat didn't swab your throat and nose at the same time.
    After a positive test result at the end of June, it was a week of lockdown and quickly arrange for a dogwalker. I just hope that I don't/can't get it again and pass it on to someone else especially as I was symptom free. Red wine (in moderation) helped me, as Chicken Soup will do well for Paul now.

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    1. It was highly unlikely that the test was going to be positive as we haven't been outof the village or in contact with anyone. If Paul's had been positive we would all have self isolated anyway.

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    2. But I believe that you would have had to do 14 days. It's so strange.....BTW are all these Amazon etc boxes and groceries CV free a lot of people are still wiping all sorts of stuff entering a household.

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  12. Wonder what they would do with me - I had my tonsils outsixty years ago!

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    1. They would just swab the place where your tonsils used to be!

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  13. You were wise to get Paul tested. Diarrhea CAN be a symptom of Covid even though it's uncommon and the high fever would have frightened me. I know people who have died from C19, and a doctor friend of ours (very healthy, young, no underlying conditions) spent 10 days in the hospital with it, he was so sick. It's a very serious thing no matter how much some people continue to deny it.

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    1. It certainly stopped us from wondering if it was or if it wasn't Covid. It was the high temperature that concerned me.

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  14. It's all very well for Rachel to be scathing, but she isn't the one who had the worrying symptoms. She may think differently if she suddenly develops a high temperature, a continual cough and struggles to breathe..... Having lost a friend, in the UK, to the virus, I would be extra vigilant.
    It makes sense to be tested if you have any concerns that you might have picked up the virus. There is always the faction who will ignore the rules - as is happening amongst the young in cities.
    We are at the end of the tourist season and are now worried that our virus numbers, previously very low, will surge, thanks to the French and German holidaymakers who have swamped the towns along the coast.

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    1. We can only act on the information that is available to us. I'm in the fortunate position of not having to go out to work or travel far afield so I just think it's safer to avoid getting the virus. The test that Paul took just meant we could eliminate that particular concern.

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  15. The Office of National Statistics are sending out letters inviting people to take a test, for payment. It's a year long programme, once a week for one month, and once a month after that. £50 for the first test ending the year with a total of £450. I suppose they have to do it over a year, a single test only indicates whether a person is positive or negative at that moment in time.

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    1. It all seems a bit hit and miss at the moment. The test was useful for us because it meant that Paul's symptoms was something other than Covid.

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