Wednesday, 24 May 2017

Hot Stuff




My daughter would say that there is no such thing as a semi-vegetarian or vegan, you either are or you’re not.  Well, I’m neither vegetarian or vegan but I am definitely becoming more aware of, and sensitive to, the growing concern for animal welfare.  These days I very rarely eat red meat (although I still enjoy chicken and fish) and I like to experiment with vegetarian and vegan recipes.

Earlier in the week I made a chilli con carne using soya.  It is a very simple recipe and just as tasty as using meat.




I added some water to re-hydrate the soya


I fried some onion and garlic and added the soya


I added tomatoes and tomato puree, red wine, cinnamon, and a dash of Worcester sauce.  I didn't have any fresh chillies so I added  a large teaspoon of....





and then a teaspoon of...




and then a teaspoon of...






The end result (I forgot to take a photo) was absolutely delicious but a little on the fiery side.  My lips stayed numb for ages.






26 comments:

  1. Ooooooooof, that does look hot with all that spice. I haven't had soy mince in a very long time. Might just try some.

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    1. I did get a little carried away with the hot spices.

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  2. Though I love veggies and have to have some with every meal except breakfast, I'm too much of a carnivore to give up meat.

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    1. There are a lot of clever vegetarian/vegan recipes out there that could convince me to give up meat, providing someone else was cooking them.

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  3. I hope that Cro sees this post :-)
    Soya mince makes for an ideal substitute meat doesn't it.

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    1. I used to be very sceptical about eating soya and tofu but I have changed my views after experimenting with some recipes. Soya mince is very versatile.

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  4. I'm thrilled to hear we're having such a positive influence on you :) We had dad's vegan lasagna last night - excellent as always.

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    1. How could I not be influenced by you!

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  5. In reply to Heron. He knows I wouldn't use meat 'substitute'. Wouldn't this have worked with finely chopped mushrooms? I have signed a pledge that Soya mince and Tofu will never enter my kitchen.

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    1. I like to be open minded about these things. I suspect the mushrooms would work well too but turning them into chilli seems like a waste of a good mushroom. (The only way to eat mushrooms is with garlic and butter!)

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  6. Sorry Sue if I'm going to sound like a spoil sport but, to consume too much soya can effect thyroid function. I was adviced not to eat it as it blocked the absorption of my medication. However it may not have negative effect on healthy people of course.
    Greetings Maria x

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    1. That's interesting Maria, I hadn't heard that before.

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    2. I've read mixed reports about soy. Everything in moderation I guess. http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/soy_wth

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  7. Are you sure it was the chilli that numbed your lips or Paul's fierce snogging when he reached across the table to thank you for his delicious dinner?

    I think that it's okay for carnivores to vary their diets with occasional vegetarian or vegan dishes. We don't have to go the whole hog!

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    1. It's okay as long as we don't think too long and hard about how the meat got on our plate.

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  8. I cannot see why vegans and vegetarians want to eat meat imitations and use meat words. If they have given up meat then that is it and it should no longer enter into their culinary vocabulary or taste bud thoughts. Perhaps Sarah would like to write an article on "vocabulary in veganism and the naming of vegan foods". This is a serious comment, not a frivolous one.

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    1. Why not? Most are familiar with the taste and texture of meat; they have not given it up because they don't like the taste but because they care about the animals. If something is called Facon they know what they get will taste like Bacon. Having said that I'm not aware they use many meat words but I'm no expert on the subject.

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    2. It isn't a criticism, it is just a puzzle to me. I noticed today that "milks" like soya milk and almond milk are now being called "drink" as opposed to "milk". Maybe others have raised this point.

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    3. Some vegans don't like meat imitations because they're too much like the real thing. Others find them helpful in replacing something they miss. As mum says, most vegans give up meat because they don't want to harm animals, not because they don't like the taste. These kinds of products are also helpful for people who are transitioning to veganism as it helps them stick to recipes they're already familiar with. I don't see why there's anything wrong with calling something vegan beef or vegan pork. I actually think meat should be labelled as what it is - cow or pig. There was a piece in the news recently about a woman who got very angry that vegans were referring to their nut-based cheeses as cheese. She ever so politely suggested that we call it Gary instead....

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    4. I take your point. However I agree with what the woman said about cheese.

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    5. I just don't know why people get so upset by it. Is it because they're afraid of accidentally eating vegan cheese?

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    6. Let's just call it Kevin and be done with it.

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  9. I'm sure I can feel the heat from here!

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    1. The creme fraiche on the side helped!

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