Monday, 29 August 2016

Give It Some Welly



Paul and I have a different approach when it comes to tackling hills whilst out cycling.  If I am free wheeling downhill and there is an uphill ahead I like to pedal fast and get as much speed and momentum as possible to tackle the incline.  Paul, on the other hand, just maintains a steady speed and ambles up the hill without a care in the world.  These differing techniques can cause a problem if he is just ahead of me and I can’t overtake.  On these occasions I tend to call out in a ladylike manner “For god’s sake, give it some welly!”






When we were cycling in Shropshire earlier in the year this wifely call almost ended in disaster.  Reacting to my “give it some welly" Paul accelerated down a very narrow lane only to suddenly meet a Range Rover coming in the opposite direction.  He applied his brakes but as it was pouring with rain and he was hurtling downhill at breakneck speed they had no effect whatsoever.  I have a clear recollection of his legs flying out in an ungainly manner as he ended up in a grassy ditch.


So, dear readers, does anyone out there in blogland know where the elegant phrase “give it some welly” comes from?

10 comments:

  1. I think that the phrase came from the wellington booted builders of the seventies who drove vans and small lorries. There again I could be wrong and am sure TS will put us right being a bit of a builder type ?

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  2. It comes from farming. I don't think TS would know anything about this, nor many other people come to that and clearly not Heron.

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  3. No need to get in a lather Rachel.
    " Give it some welly" actually means to put in a bit of effort and indeed it does comes from the building trade.

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    1. I still say it comes from farming whatever you say.

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  4. I'd like to suggest that it comes from Wellington's slap in the face to Nappy at Waterloo. 'Give it some Welly' meaning 'don't hold back'. No?

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  5. I've liked to think that the Builders and Farmers wearing wellies with claggy mud on them are unable to make soft adjustments to the accelerator pedal when driving their vehicles. We are therefore encouraged to heavy foot/ floor it/ give it some welly.
    We watched Victoria last night and saw Peter Bowles as Wellington!

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  6. Thank you for your suggestions. I'm rather inclined to think it was farmers putting their foot down on the tractors' accelerators to stop them from stalling.

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  7. I agree with Cro - all to do with the Duke of Wellington and Napoleon - give it some welly Dukey!

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    1. Wellington was called Nosey 'cause of a large one. Our late cocker spaniel was also long in the nose department and called Wellington.

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