24 January 2020

Tang Horse and Gravadlax





This morning I walked down to the village hall for my weekly dancing session.  I never realised line dancing could be so much fun.  I am finally mastering some of the steps although if my attention wanders (who is that person walking past the window?) I find myself completely flummoxed and facing the wrong way.

When I got home there was a large brown parcel waiting for me in the hallway.  I was very excited, my horse had arrived.   Poor old Jeremiah the polecat has been moved to make way for my splendid bronze Tang dynasty horse. 


The day continued in a positive manner with a tasty lunch of salmon gravadlax and scrambled eggs.  Paul had prepared the salmon by curing it in a wrapping of salt, dill and sugar for forty eight hours; he served it thinly sliced with a honey and mustard dressing. This salmon dish originates from Scandinavia when fishermen used to preserve the fish by burying it in the sand.  It sounds absolutely disgusting but was in fact delicious, with a delicate taste and texture.



I have just read this back to myself and I sound so bloody smug and self satisfied.  Sorry, I’m wearing my rose tinted spectacles today.

Paul is playing bowls tonight, he’s just gone off to polish his balls.


28 comments:

  1. Something new to learn! I think every fish eating culture has cook-free methods of preserving/eating fish. Our natives on the coast & in the north smoke &/or dry fish. Sooo good!! And I love the horse!

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    1. I always enjoy tasting different foods. I'm glad you like the horse.

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  2. Perfect last line to a "smug and self satisfied" post!! -Jenn

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    1. He honestly did say "I must go and polish my balls"!

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  3. It's ok to be happy with the little things in life, and the big ones too. The fish looks great, so does the horse.

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  4. There is something unreal about the description of the preparation of the fish. The horse is disturbing. He would frighten me in the dark.

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    1. It was very real, and we added vodka as we didn't have the gin mentioned in the recipe. Tang is slightly less disturbing than the stuffed polecat.

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  5. Much prefer the horse to the polecat. He gave me the creeps!

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    1. I had got rather fond of Jeremiah but Kat will reclaim him when she returns from her travels.

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  6. Ohhhhh, love the horse! Would like to have one myself. Now, being posh and sophisticated and all, did you use finger bowls?

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  7. Line dancing FUN? Now I know you've really become a local.

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    1. I think VdP has a club you could join!

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  8. Love the horse, too. It's a very much more suitable addition to your hall. Much more in keeping, after all the hard work you've done on the house.
    I do hope that Paul was able to get a suitable shine on his balls! What did he use to give them that extra gloss?

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  9. For smooth motion, balls need to be shaved. It is best to have this done professionally. I believe there is now a Turkish barber in Gainsborough. He will no doubt be pleased to shave Paul's balls with a freshly sharpened cut throat razor.

    P.S. I love the horse.

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  10. I buy mine at Aldi (the salmon not the horse!)

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  11. My comment sounds rather uncharitable. I just wanted to advise readers without such a talented husband in the kitchen how they could enjoy this dish with minimum effort.

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    1. Actually that's interesting to see that Aldi sell gravadlax.

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    2. I buy mine from the local Aldi, too.

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  12. I hope you are okay Sue...or did you just get fed up of blogging? Here's hoping you blog again - some day soon. Best wishes, Neil (YP)

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    1. I'm fine, just short of things to blog about at the moment! Nice that you missed me though.

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